TelevisionMade possible by

LNBB Appreciation Day: Jeremy Wells Edition

In an attempt to share the love around the Late Night Big Breakfast crew, we thought would shine a spotlight on Jeremy Wells, the deadpan co-host with the slickest suits and the even slicker hair.

When he takes to the LNBB couch, Wells invariably stares down the barrel of the camera with the same alarming sincerity of Rawdon Christie chatting to Dame Mary Poppins. Interviewing LNBB guests from across the suite, it’s a constant surprise to see that his piercing gaze doesn’t tear straight through them and set fire to Soft Furnishings and Haberdasheries. The man should get a Canon for ‘Best Talking Done By Eyes’ in 2014 (and also while we are at it, backdated to Eating Media Lunch). His gaze is focussed, but his questions are intentionally and wildly confused.

What Wells manages to highlight in his intense (yet ultimately vacuous) presenter persona is the fabricated film of earnestness that has settled upon breakfast television. Nobody actually wants to learn how to do Capoeira at 9am. Nobody actually cares about how to use Glad Bags for everything like some psychotic MacGyver. But the presenters are sure as hell not going to let the audience know that. They will grin and make jokes as they co-operatively chug down tins of tomatoes in the interests of the public. They will stare down that camera, forever.

Wells also co-hosts the Radio Hauraki breakfast show with Matt Heath and Laura McGoldrick, giving him another platform to endlessly critique the absurdity of the media. This comes mostly in a hell of a Hosking impression. Check out Hauraki TV’s “Adventures of the 13th Most Popular Morning Show” to see more of Wells shooting a t-shirt gun in the face of Jay-Jay, Mike and Dom convention.

Watch the full “Adventures of the 13th Most Popular Breakfast Show” here

Watch the final episode of Late Night Big Breakfast on TV One tonight at 10.20pm

The Spinoff Longform Fund is dedicated to facilitating investigative journalism. Our focus is on supporting in-depth reporting on important New Zealand stories. Your donation will help us sustain this most resource-intensive form of journalism, ensuring that the most complex and important stories still get told.