Te Rā the sail, last of its kind

A team of University of Otago researchers and weavers will unlock the secrets of one of te ao Māori’s most precious taonga for the first time in more than 200 years.

How Ngāi Tahu turned a landmark settlement into a billion dollar iwi empire

Ngāi Tahu spent 150 years in poverty, dispossessed of the vast majority of their whenua and mahinga kai. Today, 20 years on from their landmark settlement with the Crown, they're sitting atop a billion dollar pūtea.

Whakawhiti te rā: New Zealand sport, haka and the Māori perspective

From an erratic flailing of limbs to the psychological powerhouse we know today, little is known about how haka developed into a steadfast tradition in New Zealand sport.

The Māori lawyer fighting for indigenous rights all over the world

With a career that's taken her from Whakatāne to Otago, to Harvard and the front lines of Standing Rock, lawyer Natalie Coates has fought for Māori and indigenous rights wherever she's been needed.

Ātea Otago Archive

‘The key word is manaakitanga’: Trading indigenous knowledge with First Nations peoples

As winter passes and new life takes hold in New Zealand, indigenous guests from far abroad have arrived to exchange cultural knowledge. 

The power, importance, and future of the Māori roll

Māori are in the process of choosing which electoral roll to vote from. Simon Day spoke to Dr Paerau Warbrick about what that decision means. 

Otago’s Māori students are raising their voices

As the University of Otago Māori student body grows, so too do their aspirations for a space to call their own.

Power to the people: finding a cure for healthcare inequity

Māori, Pacific and low income groups have a health outcomes well below the rest of the population. In Dunedin there's a community that's come up with the medicine to treat itself. 

Incentivising good parenting: how a groundbreaking East Coast app is supporting stronger families

An app that gives parents important information and rewards them for attending appointments is being tested on the East Coast. Rural New Zealand gets the sharp end of a lot …

Teaching water safety the Māori way

Māori are continually over-represented in Aotearoa's drowning statistics. Simon Day spoke to University of Otago's Dr Anne-Marie Jackson about using traditional techniques to help teach water safety and reconnect Māori with their awa.

If the hills could sue: Jacinta Ruru on legal personality and a Māori worldview

New Zealand led the world with the recognition of the legal personhood of the Whanganui River and Te Urewera ranges. Otago University professor of law, Jacinta Ruru, says this needs to be the start of a Māori worldview contribution to our legal system and the way we look after our environment.