Was that gross 60 Minutes interview with Jacinda Ardern actually a rom-com?

Australian 60 Minutes presenter Charles Wooley this week revealed himself to be in love, or “smitten”, with Jacinda Ardern. Madeleine Chapman watched and wept.

Charles Wooley just wanted to ask Jacinda Ardern out for a date. It’s not that complicated. Except it is, because he did so via a 13 minute creep fest of an interview for 60 Minutes. The segment was heavily edited and covered at least a full day with the prime minister and partner Clarke Gayford. The fact that the finished product was that bad is worrying. What other weird things had he cut from his original love letter to the prime minister? Did he challenge Gayford to a duel for Ardern’s hand in marriage? Because that’s exactly where the segment was heading.

It’s a long, painful watch, so we at the Spinoff have taken one for the team and cut it down to the essential narrative. Not included but very gross was this exchange:

CW: There is one very important political question I have to ask you and that is what exactly is the date the baby’s due?

JA: Seventeenth of June.

CW: Seventeenth. It’s interesting how much people have been counting back to…the conception, as it were.

CG: Really?

CW: Having produced six children it doesn’t amaze me that people can have children. Why shouldn’t a child be conceived during an election campaign?

Enjoy the rest of your day knowing that Charles Wooley has been meticulously counting backwards on a calendar to find out exactly what day our prime minister had sex.

Video edited by Alice Webb-Liddall

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