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An incomplete catalogue of television’s strongest winter looks

Still feeling the chill? Tara Ward assembles some of the best fashions on Lightbox to warm the cockles of your cold heart. 

It’s International Fashion Day, everyone! If you’re sitting on your couch in your favourite pyjamas with the elastic waistband and the ripped crotch, eating stale pretzels and wondering how you can give such an important day the respect it deserves, then worry no more. Seriously, calm down. It’s going to be fine.

I’ve taken a stroll down the catwalk of life, wandered into my televisual closet and filled a goody bag with a stylish selection of iconic fashion moments. Prepare to be sartorially inspired, because this fashion runway will take us back in time, around the world and over an Irish donkey. I mean, what symbolises fashion better than an Irish donkey? I think you’ll find the answer is NOTHING.

Let us join hands across the water and celebrate International Fashion Day together. You’ll never see clothes in the same light again, and for that, I apologise. 

The Killing: perfect little snowflakes

Your nana was right: you should wear wool in winter, because it keeps your kidneys warm but it also turns you into a kickarse, crime-solving Danish detective. The Killing’s Sarah Lund took wool by its short and curlies and made it cool again, for which we must show our gratitude by taking a pair of snips to the nearest hairy lamb and knit ourselves a million jerseys covered in tiny snowflakes.

Emma from The Wiggles

Coldplay wrote a song about her, The Beatles named a submarine in her honour, and I do the propeller every time I see the all-singing, all-dancing ball of sunshine that is Emma Wiggle. Those tights, those shoes, that daffodil-coloured skivvy — how could every day not be a bow-tiful day in this cheery ensemble?

It’s no wonder Lachie falls asleep in his batshit boring purple turtleneck, I mean PURPLE ffs, it’s not even a colour.

Seinfeld’s Pirate Shirt

Stupidest shirt you’ve ever seen, or a moment of fashion genius? You decide.

Moone Boy‘s double vision

Like Milli and Vanilli, the best things in life come in twos. Prepare yourselves, because the identical outfits of Irish duo Martin Moone and his imaginary friend Sean Murphy will set your fashion world on fire like a 90s polyester shirt that got too close to the radiator.

Whether it’s riding a donkey, doing the Dirty Dancing lift at the school disco or glamming up for a gypsy wedding, Martin and Sean’s matching wardrobe screams 90s style as loudly as the show’s opening credits shout “WHERE’S ME JUMPER? WHERE’S ME JUMPER?”. Where is me jumper? Maybe the donkey knows.

Charlotte’s wigs in Harlots

Harlot’s wig game is fierce af, and best of all, there’s enough room in there to stash your keys and phone. Wigs: winning since 1763.

 

Jamie’s big piece of material in Outlander

Praise be that ginger goes with everything, because there are more iconic looks in Outlander than there are fans of Sam Heughan’s knees.

The greatest piece of Outlander fashion has to be Jamie Fraser’s kilt, a single piece of fabric approximately 12 kilometres long that ends up wrapped around the finest pair of loins this side of Loch Lomond. Let’s just count our blessings they didn’t have elastic in the 1700s, or we’d have missed this visual symphony of Big Ginge dressing himself on the floor.

International Fashion Day, we have seen the light. Consider ourselves inspired, and may our pirate shirts always be puffed up, our wigs always be roomy and may we always have a bowtiful day.


Click below to watch Harlots, Outlander, The Killing, Moone Boy and Seinfeld on Lightbox:

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