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Guns N’ Roses live review: Paula Bennett, our Deputy PM, reports from bogan heaven

Politician and proud Westie Paula Bennett was at Saturday night’s Guns N’ Roses concert at Western Springs in Auckland. So we invited her to file a review.

If my inner bogan had an outing on Saturday night at the Guns N’ Roses concert then my bloke’s outer bogan was in heaven. As we joined half of West Auckland and other fans from around the country, the sun shone, the sound blasted and the bogan head nod was 50,000 strong.

RUB IT IN WHY DONTCHA?

I’m not a reviewer so you won’t get a song-by-song analysis, but my favourite of the night was ‘Live and Let Die’. It’s when Axl truly came into his own. Yes, Axl and the band had aged, but so had the crowd. I reckon once he put on his hat he got his mojo. For a bunch of old fellas they rocked and rolled for over two-and-a-half hours and the crowd loved it.

Wolfmother were a perfect opening act, I enjoyed them a lot more than I thought I would. I did have a moment as they were playing hard when I realised that in just 24 hours I would be replacing the jeans, black top and hard rock for a frock and a brass band at the Royal New Zealand Navy’s Beat Retreat in Waitangi, but for now fists were pumping and they sounded great.

I’m so pleased I went, I had a house full of friends from Taupo who had come up especially for the concert and over a few bourbons later in the evening the consensus was that GNR still had it. Slash still deserves the title ‘greatest guitar player in the world’ and when Axl warms up he can belt it out like no one else can.


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