Stereotypes and stigma: Drug use in the LGBTQ community

Judgement prevents understanding, which in itself is a barrier to preventing unsafe behaviour. Are different approaches to harm reduction in the Rainbow community needed? 



The recent discovery of a fossil parrot the size of a human toddler reinforces the case for Foulden Maar to be protected.

The three governing parties are turning their attention to next year's general election. Jo Moir surveys the field.


The Best Of

Over 400 doctors, most specialising in child health, have signed an open letter to the coroner expressing concerns about a judgement which blamed alcohol in breast milk for the death of an infant.

The Opportunities Party’s new leaders have firmed up control of the party after a weekend of sweeping organisational reforms.

An exclusive interview with the principled principal who is leading the resistance to long-haired lads at high school.


Cameron Slater’s mendacious, bullshit-ridden site has finally been shut down – and yet, somehow, the grift goes on.

Psychiatry always thinks it’s on the verge of understanding and curing mental illness, but its real history is a story of torturers and frauds, a new book shows.

Participating in some of NZ's local elections can be a challenge, thanks to the unusual voting methodologies. We're here to help.

The review of the 2018 census backs up his experience that Statistics New Zealand is a monster with a small but distant brain, writes Tony Burton.

After 51 Muslims were murdered in Christchurch, does Corrections really not understand the potential for serious harm if they fail to do their job to the highest standards?


The National leader says census data is so ropey we should halt redrawing electorate boundaries. Down that path lie 'alternative facts'.

An independent review into the data shortfall in the first digital-driven census has seen the government statistician fall on her Y-axis.

Wine should be fun, not intimidating – all you need is a little knowledge. Yvonne Lorkin, co-founder and chief tasting officer of WineFriend, provides some simple tips to help you empower your palate. 

We review the entire country and culture of New Zealand, one thing at a time. Today, Alice Neville critiques a curious culinary union. 

Don't chuck those lovely feathery green carrot tops in the compost bin – make this instead!


While the debate around methane continues to stink up the place, we are overlooking countless different ways to protect our food security in the future, writes climate activist Melanie Vautier. 

A crack team of Spinoff taste testers munched their way through 34 dairy-free cheese alternatives to bring you this definitive list of the good, the bad and the ugly.

Business is Boring host Simon Pound speaks with Michael Allpress, founder of Allpress Espresso.

MediaWorks’ CEO asks us to imagine a world with only government-owned TV news.

Several labels turned down a proposal that would have seen a multinational cigarette manufacturer pay their fees and venue costs. Business editor Maria Slade reports.


New Zealand's largest company has warned it will lose as much as $675m this year. What has happened in dairying and are we doomed?

Who's on it, who's up, who's down, and how did they get there?

It's the season finale of The Handmaid's Tale, and we're desperate for a happy ending. Will we get one, or will we be left weeping into our revolution muffins? Tara Ward recaps

Tara Ward reviews Deep Water, a new British drama that's been compared to Big Little Lies that lands on TVNZ OnDemand today.

The Real Pod assembles to dissect the week in reality television and real life, with special thanks to Nando’s.


Sam Brooks reviews the second season premiere of Succession, the dark-as-tar family drama from one of the minds behind The Thick of It.

He's been looking for another Earth, but will Australia's new Bachelor be able to find love?

When Josie Adams broke her laptop she knew she’d never find love like that again. She reviews how its replacement stands up to everyday use, and the cosmic forces that seek to destroy her.

The widespread use of the imperial flag suggests that New Zealanders' knowledge of the second world war is incomplete.

After the recent deaths of two horses following a Taumarunui jump race, sparks have once again flared between animal rights groups and the racing community.


Caroline Moratti goes all the way undercover to discover the truth about nude modelling for artists and photographers.

What does it say about our sporting bodies that we’d even consider letting those who have admitted sexual assault compete under our banner?

The only published and available best-selling indie book chart in New Zealand is the top 10 sales list recorded every week at Unity Books’ stores in High St, Auckland, and Willis St, Wellington.

More than a century after Dickens gave us Tiny Tim, writers often fail to make disability anything other than a narrative crutch.

Paula Green, madwoman, took it upon herself to launch three (3) books this month. The biggie is Wild Honey, a deeply-researched but accessible tribute to women poets in New Zealand. We've a review underway, but for now, let's talk about the cover – the bit that hits you first. It's a painting by artist and writer Sarah Laing, bright and stingingly gorgeous. Somehow, amid the maelstrom, Paula managed to write this piece about how the cover came to be, and how it connects with the pages inside. 


The only published and available best-selling indie book chart in New Zealand is the top 10 sales list recorded every week at Unity Books’ stores in High St, Auckland, and Willis St, Wellington.

New work by Island Bay poet James Brown.

The land protection movement at Ihumātao may have wrongly been pitted as rangatahi versus rangatira, but it has given rise to a new generation of ideas.

This year Nicole Hawkins has decided to opt out of Visa Wellington on Plate over their refusal to engage with people who are offended by their marketing creative.

When the University of Otago was founded 150 years ago the interests of local Māori were disregarded. But in the last 50 years, engagement with tangata whenua has become an essential part of the university's identity.


Herbs: Songs of Freedom director Tearepa Kahi discusses the ‘constant riddle’ of documentary making, and the joys and sorrows of celebrating 40 years of one of our most important bands.

This ruling on the prisoner voting ban says to the government: put up or shut up.

The best little art show about the environment is big on charm and low on preaching and you can find it at Robert Heald Gallery in Wellington for one more week. Megan Dunn reviews.

David Eggleton considers the remarkable radiance and Canterbury swamp fog of Tony De Lautour's paintings in this mid-career survey at Dunedin Public Art Gallery

A bus stop, a soap dish, beer crates and a pile of rubbish: in celebration of the 20th anniversary of the National Contemporary Art award, we look at the media …


At the Auckland Art Gallery, a grand tour of escapism, adventure and parochialism with NZ's quintessential expatriate artist.

Aaron Kreisler looks beyond the gags in this survey of an artist and his dogs at the Christchurch Art Gallery. “The dog really must love him, it’s so incredibly patient…”, a …

The world’s largest parrot, standing up to a metre tall with a beak that could crack most food sources, used to live in New Zealand.

Forget 1080 – these days 5G is the conspiracy theory that everyone is freaking out about. But is there any basis for the scare stories? Emily Writes tries to unravel fact from fiction.

Otago scientists say the lobby group has misrepresented the research.


Each year, thousands of students embark on a Bachelor of Health Sciences degree, the first step in a number of challenging healthcare careers. But what happens when you realise Health Sci isn't for you?

From a school for budding beekeepers to a street-side garden growing produce for locals, Auckland’s abuzz with projects making the city safer for pollinators.

The old utopian ideal of an unmoderated free speech arena can't survive this upswing in right wing violence, writes the co-author of a report calling for greater regulation of the internet.

The terrorist who killed 20 people in El Paso over the weekend claimed direct inspiration from the Christchurch mosque shootings. Don Rowe explores how our darkest day became an aspirational target for the far right.  

Air New Zealand released their new safety video this morning, featuring the legendary Louis Litt from legal drama Suits. Tara Ward buckles up to watch. 


Peter Ellis will finally have his appeal against decades-old child sex abuse convictions heard in the Supreme Court.

Two months of sustained coverage of the local elections, all around New Zealand – brought to you by The Spinoff Members.

After fifteen years, American-targeted satire video game Metal Wolf Chaos XD finally makes it way out of Japan. Sam Brooks looks at how much more prescient the game is now, and why that is.

Sam Brooks reviews Fire Emblem: Three Houses, which perfectly splits difference between staying true to its core while reinventing itself to appeal to a broader audience.

Sam Brooks re-assesses Assassin's Creed Odyssey in the wake of ten months of post-release content and works out what the game did right, did wrong, and did weird.


A personal journey from reasonable trepidation to sweet love for the video game Minecraft.

Māori culture shouldn't be something that's half-heartedly appropriated for some cool video game visuals. So why do developers keep doing it?

Jonny Potts leaves a message for one of the musicians that mattered to him most: David Berman of the Silver Jews, who died this week.

Featuring a New Zealand supergroup, a Spanish superstar, Canadian's finest super-lesbians (just go with it) and more.

Claire Duncan chats with experimental sound artist Betty Apple about her upcoming New Zealand tour, and where her work fits within the international noise music scene.


Since their first single release in 2015, Leisure has had over 75 million streams and a handful of sold-out international concerts. Jaden Parkes sat down to talk about the secret of success: leisure time.

Fifteen tracks, 22 guests, one album. There are a lot of reasons why Ed Sheeran's new collab album shouldn't work. The surprising thing is how much of it does.

It's like Christmas every fortnight, and an antidote to the great plastic pile-up.

We keep hearing that Kids These Days are mollycoddled and risk-averse, but is that really true? And guess who gets blamed when kids do take risks and things go wrong?

It's a scary world out there, and there's a lot for you as a parent to be frightened of. But what are the things you should be most freaked out …


New research shows there's been a dramatic increase in the number of New Zealand children getting injured playing sport. It's a timely reminder that kids don't need competition to be active, writes ACC's Isaac Carlson.

It's 'important for mothers and midwives to plan well ahead of their delivery', according to the head of the Southern DHB. Intrigued, Emily Writes decided to find out more.

A riposte against a ghastly and unfair misrepresentation of a noble campaign.

For Auckland host Timothy Giles talks to longtime Auckland councillor Penny Hulse about her time in council, why she's stepping down and her hopes for the future.

Timothy Giles speaks to Grace Stratton about accessibility in fashion and in life, for the latest episode of For Auckland.


A Hurricanes true believer on a massive Super Rugby shift.

No, more density doesn't mean more traffic – and other widespread myths about the effects of increased housing, busted by Greater Auckland's Heidi O'Callahan.

In 2003 the Silver Ferns won the Netball World Cup after a 16-year winning streak by the Australian Diamonds. In 2019, they've just done exactly the same thing.

The architect of the incredible turnaround the Silver Ferns have enjoyed is now off-contract.

The Offspin podcast tries to make sense of the greatest cricket game of all time, and not seeing the Black Caps win it.


The Black Caps were a critical part of what is probably the greatest game of cricket ever played, writes Duncan Greive. Is that enough to get over having lost it?

We dare to believe in a Black Caps World Cup victory.

On the latest episode of The Good Citizen podcast, Anahera Rawiri talks to Jeremy Hansen about a uniquely Māori solution to Auckland’s housing crisis.

Alex Casey, Leonie Hayden, Michèle A’Court tackle the past month in women, with thanks to our friends at The Women’s Bookshop. 

In the second episode of Actually Interesting, The Spinoff’s new monthly podcast exploring the effect AI has on our lives, Russell Brown explores how aware machines really are.


Welcome back to Papercuts, our monthly books podcast hosted by Louisa Kasza, Jenna Todd and Kiran Dass.

Business is Boring host talks to Vaka Interactiv CEO and co-founder Jesse Armstrong.

Judgement prevents understanding, which in itself is a barrier to preventing unsafe behaviour. Are different approaches to harm reduction in the Rainbow community needed? 

Wine should be fun, not intimidating – all you need is a little knowledge. Yvonne Lorkin, co-founder and chief tasting officer of WineFriend, provides some simple tips to help you empower your palate. 

Our writers celebrate the very best episode of their favourite TV shows on NEON. Don't @ us, our decisions are final. 


On the latest episode of The Good Citizen podcast, Anahera Rawiri talks to Jeremy Hansen about a uniquely Māori solution to Auckland’s housing crisis.

When the University of Otago was founded 150 years ago the interests of local Māori were disregarded. But in the last 50 years, engagement with tangata whenua has become an essential part of the university's identity.

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