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Inside the Lightbox: What shows would the Queen like this Queen’s Birthday Weekend?

Inside the Lightbox is a sponsored segment where we line up shows from the catalogue that you might like to watch. For Queen’s birthday weekend, Alex Casey and Madeleine Chapman line up a slew of shows that Liz herself would enjoy. 

Almost Royal

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If her photobombing shenanigans are anything to go by, we can all agree that the Queen loves a giggle as much as the next person. If true, she would love to kick back in her slippers and enjoy Almost Royal, the BBC’s faux-reality series following two wannabe English elites as they travel to America and try to weasel their way up the aristocratic chain. With each episode opening with their place in line to the throne (never closer than 50 places), the Queen can breathe a sigh of relief that her status is secure… for now. / AC

Mad Men

While we regular folk might watch Mad Men and marvel at the fashion, cigars, and hard liquor of the 1960’s, Queen Lizzy will probably be all “been there, done that.” A true matriarch, the Queen has been known to enjoy a drop or two fairly regularly. While Don Draper is a Canadian Club man, Elizabeth II prefers to indulge in a tipple of gin with her breakfast(!) and lunch. Her Majesty in 1961 would fit right in at the offices of the Sterling Cooper ad agency; devising promotion plans with Peggy, ogling at Don, fighting off the advances from junior ad men, and coming up with an even better pitch than Don’s projector one to Kodak. / MC

Wolf Hall

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Fed up with 2016, the Queen might find herself pining for days gone by – back when the royals wore puffy hats the whole time and carried candles everywhere. Lucky for her, Wolf Hall can provide all that, a dramatic retelling of Thomas Cromwell’s rise to power in the Tudor court of King Henry VIII. As our own Tara Ward called it, Wolf Hall is a rich and considered imagining of the 16th century England monarchy – think Made in Chelsea but with more fur coats. / AC

Mr Robot

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The Queen would go absolutely barking-corgi-mad for Mr Robot. Here’s something you might not know about old mate Liz: she first used the internet on March 26 1976, making her one of the first heads of state in HUMAN HISTORY to ever send an email.

If that technological savvy isn’t enough to impress you, her official Facebook page is also jam-packed with royal hacks. She’s made it impossible to send her a friend request and if you try to ‘poke’ her, you will be added to an official mailing list for upcoming royal engagements. With that level of cyber pwnage operating in Buckingham Palace, Mr Robot would be the perfect techno-thriller for her to enjoy this long weekend. / AC

Downton Abbey

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It’s a little on the nose for the Queen to love Downton Abbey but of course she does. There are butlers with coats, dogs with tails, dogs with tails being treated more kindly than butlers with coats. Her Majesty even spotted a historical error in the show. Nothing screams diehard fan like insisting on pointing out an innocent mistake. It hasn’t been confirmed but rumour has it that Elizabeth fancies herself to be quite the Maggie Smith at dinner parties. / MC

Outlander

Behind Ed Sheeran and Ron Weasley, the Queen’s own grandson Prince Harry is the world’s most famous ginger. Following him close behind has got to be Outlander’s Jamie Fraser, the flame-haired heartthrob who captures the affections of a wandering time traveller in Claire. With a penchant for old stuff (Jamie is 300 years old) and the picturesque Scottish highlands (Queenie visits every year), Outlander provides the perfect blend of history and romantic escapism for a modern woman like Liz. / AC


 

Click below to enjoy all the Queen’s favourites* now on Lightbox

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