Unity Books best-seller chart for the week ending May 18

The week’s  best-selling books at the Unity stores in Willis St, Wellington, and High St, Auckland.

WELLINGTON UNITY

1 New Ships by Kate Duignan (Victoria University Press, $30)

New Zealand novel, praised to the skies this week on National Radio; the Spinoff Review of Books looks forward to the forthcoming review by Claire Mabey.

2 Warlight by Michael Ondaatje (Jonathan Cape, $35)

The first novel in seven years by the author of The English Patient.

3 Song for Rosaleen by Pip Desmond (Massey University Press, $30)

“I read about a hairdresser who had three customers pass away under the hairdryer; she took it as a compliment that they’d felt relaxed enough to do so.” Beautiful memoir of coping with a mother’s dementia.

4 Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (HarperCollins, $25)

Its sold nearly 450,000 copies in 30 countries, Reese Witherspoon has bought the film rights, and it won the book of the year this week at the British Book Awards.

5 Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking by Samin Nosrat (Canongate, $55)

Or, as reviewer Linda Burgess often refers to it, Plump Salt Eater.

6 Temptation of Forgiveness by Donna Leon (William Heinemann, $35)

Detective novel.

7 The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson (Macmillan, $35)

The Spinoff Review of Books wishes to make a public appeal: is there anyone out there who’d like to write a thoughtful, critical, readable essay on this massively popular trash?

8 Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover (Hutchinson, $38)

A review by Kim Hill will appear next week at the Spinoff Review of Books.

9 All This by Chance by Vincent O’Sullivan (Victoria University Press, $35)

“This will be a classic of New Zealand literature”: The Listener.

10 Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World by Simon Winchester (HarperCollins, $37)

From the Rolls Royce to Seiko, and precisely engineered points inbetween.

AUCKLAND UNITY

1 Warlight by Michael Ondaatje (Jonathan Cape, $35)

The Cost of Living by Deborah Levy (Hamish Hamilton, $35)

“At the age of 50, the acclaimed writer was divorced and living in a new flat. In elliptical, allusive prose, she re-engages with the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir”: The Guardian.

The New Animals by Pip Adam (Victoria University Press, $30)

Judged winner of the best novel of the year at this week’s Ockham New Zealand national book awards.

Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World by Simon Winchester (William Collins, $37)

5 The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Society by Mary Ann Shaffer & Anne Barrows (Allen & Unwin, $25)

The book of the movie.

6 Pamper Me to Hell and Back by Hera Lindsay Bird (Smith|Doorstop Books, $17)

A full, detailed report on the poet’s sold-out reading this week at the London Review Bookshop will appear next week at the Spinoff Review of Books.

7  The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson (Hutchinson, $38)

The strange and bewitching story of the theft of priceless bird skins from the British Museum of Natural History.

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles (Windmill Books, $26)

Thriller; trash.

A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey (Macmillan, $38)

FBI confidential; trash.

10 12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson (Allen Lane, $40)

Instructions for living; trash.


The Spinoff Review of Books is proudly brought to you by Unity Books.

Related:


The Spinoff is made possible by the generous support of the following organisations.
Please help us by supporting them.