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Ain’t No Party Like a Minor Party: The Debate in Vines

The multi-party leaders debate aired on Saturday night on TV1. Hosking took to the podium with his standard halo back-lighting. Although the angelic effect paired with his twinkling wet eyes was breathtaking, it was not enough to distract from the fact that he had seriously downgraded his wardrobe. Swapping out the three-piece suit of the first debate for a simple two-piece, the man was slumming it. Frankly, he came across as damn-near slovenly. Perhaps only the big cheeses are worthy of a Hosking waistcoat.

Hosking went straight for the jugular early on, getting the important questions out of the way. “What’s your favourite movie” and “What’s your favourite fast food?” The nation joined hands and rejoiced to find out that Horan is basically whorin’ himself for a lovely bit of pizza 24/7. Jamie White also had a small brain fart about McDonald’s.

When they cut back from the ad break a little early, we saw something inspiring. It was Russel Norman, and he was having a little dance. Disobeying Judge Hosking’s orders to stay still, he brought a bit of fun to the table. It was pretty much an exact remake of Footloose.

Amongst all of the fast food banter and the knee-sliding Norman, there were bigger issues at play. I’m referring, of course, to the constant threat of water spillage. Like a set up for a very elaborate ice bucket challenge, the politicians’ glasses of water were perched precariously on some sort of levitating wire ledge. Who would be the first to take a daring sip and place the cup perfectly back in its dubious grasp? Only the most seasoned pro in the game of course.

As Peter Dunne said, the debate “never set out to be spectacular”. Let us look forward to the final leader’s debate on Wednesday 17th September on TV One. Here’s hoping Hosking can scrub up – and maybe even have a little boogie for once in his life.

You can watch the Multi-Party Debate on TVNZ Ondemand here.

 

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