Tag: Ngā Mōrehu

The Royal Commission into state care abuse: how to make a public submission

From today, the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Historical Abuse in State Care is welcoming submissions from the public on the draft Terms of Reference.

New Zealand’s problem with Māori boys

The success or failure of the Royal Commission of Inquiry into state welfare abuse will depend on how much attention it gives to Māori boys – and a change in New Zealand’s attitude, writes Aaron Smale.

Sorry means you don’t do it again

Ōtaki's Māoriland Film Festival, which kicks off this week, features a documentary about Australia’s apology for the Stolen Generations – and what’s happened since. Aaron Smale spoke to director Larissa Behrendt.

A perpetrator can’t be a saviour: the state abuse historic claims system must go

The announcement of a Royal Commission of Inquiry into the abuse of children in state care has been met with praise and relief, but survivors may be worse off if the historic claims unit within the MSD is allowed to remain.

Ngā Wāhine Mōrehu: putting women back in the state abuse conversation

A former ward of the state asks that any inquiry into state care abuse remembers that women were victims too. 

Revictimisation is a real risk in a state care abuse inquiry. Here is how to avoid it

Around the world, there are many abuse victims who have been saddened, angered or re-victimised from inquiry processes. These are the lessons for New Zealand, writes criminologist Elizabeth Stanley.

Our stolen generation: a slow genocide

Indigenous peoples throughout English-speaking countries have had their children taken away by the state for generations. Most countries have faced up to this legacy but New Zealand has been in …

Our stolen generation: a nonchalant wickedness

Indigenous peoples throughout English-speaking countries have had their children taken away by the state for generations. Most countries have faced up to this legacy but New Zealand has been in …

Our stolen generation: a shameful legacy

With NZ committed to setting up an inquiry into state abuse within 100 days, Aaron Smale looks at stories from New Zealand, Canada and Australia, and ask what we can learn.